Allendale, Northumberland.

Our travels took us to South-West Northumberland, a place which i myself have not had the pleasure of walking around. There are many places round this beautiful part of Northumberland to walk, but for us we chose to walk round Deneholm woods which is literally right next to the small village of Allendale.

We parked in Allendale itself, which was easily accessible, parking places were crying out for cars. We decided to walk from Allendale town centre back over the bridge and up the hill which then took us to an opening to Deneholm woods. The woods have been well looked after, walks clearly sign posted and wooden bridges built to walk across the River Allen.

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Above are a few pictures taken from our walk at the beginning.


As we got out from Deneholm woods we began to approach a few houses/cottages, one of which had around 20 to 30 chickens casually exploring the local environs.

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I’m no expert but as the back of the car clearly states, this is a Rover, an old one at that but it has been kept in such pristine condition that it deserved to be framed. What an absolute beauty.


We decided to go back from the cottages as time was getting on and the route appeared exhausted as there were no clear visible paths so we walked and from this bridge i was able to capture some wildlife, or at least i tried to frame it.


On we went, back to the town of Allendale by going back the same way we came. The walk itself is about 2 miles long. Serious walkers need not apply but anyone who would like to enjoy a small but peaceful walk then this is the one. Once we were back at Allendale, this pub we were sure kept calling our names, so we thought it would be rude not to go in buy a pint!

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Cragside, Northumberland – Part Three

Part Three is the last chapter of the album which I’d like to share with you all. We walked back from the Garden to the car park and followed the paths which took us further up the hill and away from Cragside House. The paths were great and i could imagine them being super fun for families to enjoy too.


The first picture is the cafe which you can find walking back from the gardens, and at the iron bridge turn left on your way to the other pump house. After the pump house, you go up some steps near a reservoir and the cafe is on your way towards the car park. As we began the walks, you get a different perspective of Cragside House.

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The start of the trail pretty much sets the standard in terms of how beautiful the walk is.


Using the macro lense to take close up’s of moss and small tree’s, sometimes using it to take pictures of things further away which is a bit of a rookie error.


All of a sudden, you get ‘that feeling’ something could be moving so you look, and lo and behold a red squirrel was scurrying around the tree’s. Quickly, i tried to swap lenses so i could get closer to it, you can just about make it out through the branches as it was trying its best to disguise itself.


There are also fun things for Children to feast their eyes on and learn in the process, various animals and insects which have been made and planted on the trail. Due to my macro lense, there was a picture of a place in the middle of the trail which serves as a midway point, picnic benches, play area to sit and rest, unfortunately this picture was too blurry to illustrate. There was also a labyrinth which was brilliant and we pretty much got lost in it for a while which was good fun. This demonstrates the hard work that has gone in to make Cragside the place it is today, a place where you can discover despite getting lost along the way. Definitely recommended.


After we got to the lakes it was time to make our way back. Apparently, there is over 40 miles of walks to discover so we only covered maybe 6 or 7. Another 33 or 34 to go…

Craster – Dunstanburgh Castle – Embleton Bay & back again…

It’s not every day the Sun comes out to dance with Northumberland, but when it does, it simply gives Northumberland the shine it deservedly needs after the Winter months. Therefore, my partner and I decided we’d visit Craster for some much needed peace and tranquility, and the idea succeeded and went beyond all expectations. The backdrop of Dunstanburgh Castle from Craster serves as a reminder for a land full of historic battles, defending ourselves from the Scots who would often invade Northumberland as a way of attacking the English.

Not much is left of Dunstanburgh Castle, but as it is an English Heritage Site, it thankfully attracts many visitors from around the Country and Abroad to visit. For full information of the site itself, please click on the hyperlink provided above. Despite there not being much left of Dunstanburgh Castle itself, you can still appreciate the scale of the Castle in its prime. The walk itself was enough to stretch our legs but it’s also a great way of inhaling some much needed fresh air, getting away from it all, and about being ‘in the moment’.


Below is a close up of the entrance to Dunstanburgh Castle.

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As you can see, the clear day enhanced the quality of the pictures ten fold. We were lucky to have such a beautiful day on the cards as it had been forecast for cloud all that day. Against all odds, algorithms, predictions… the sun prevailed victorious. We sat outside and had our lunch, taking in the view from Dustanburgh Castle back over to Craster, the landscape is absolutely stunning and it’s easy to see why this land is an AONB (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty). Below is a picture of the view we had from the Castle with Craster in the backdrop. The sea glistening, flowering bushes and green fields as far as the eyes can see.

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After our much needed lunch, we decided to continue walking round the Castle from the outside, heading in the direction of Embleton Bay which we could see North of us lying in the distance. Descending the hill in which the almighty ancient ruins lay on, we took a couple of pictures of the rocks, cliffs in which sea faring birds have come to roost and of the Dunstanburgh Golf Course, luckily, all golfers were on form and we were able to stroll without being hit.

The path took us on towards Embleton Bay, meandering on the outskirts of the Golf Course we passed a couple pillboxes from the World War era, purposely built to defend the land from any attacks or to spot any potential invasions. Embleton Bay itself, is pristine, the dunes peer over and stretch for a good distance. There were all sorts of activities going on, from locals walking their dogs, people building sand castles which were close to emulating Dunstanburgh’s scale!!

We didn’t spend much time on Embleton Bay despite its true beauty, the only reason being, we were hungry and we needed to be fed so we headed back on ourselves to Craster.  As we’d heard so much about two things in Craster, one being how good the kippers are and how they’re famous for them, and the other how good the food is at ‘The Jolly Fisherman‘, we thought, it would be rude not to try both. I would definitely recommend their seafood platter, consisting of  fresh rolled herring which had been pickled, a slice of fresh salmon, crab pate, salmon pate, trout pate and a small serving of prawn marie-rose presented inside an oyster shell. The beef dripping chips along with the soup of the day did not disappoint either, and our complimentary pints in the sun went down a treat with the sun continuing to burn the back of my neck!

Please find a few pictures of the small beautiful fishing village of Craster, The Jolly Fisherman, Shoreline Cafe & Traditional Fish Smokers establishment and the lovely view from where we sat at The Jolly Fisherman overlooking Dunstanburgh Castle. If you visit The Jolly Fisherman, please bear in mind that it can be busy therefore you might expect to wait a little while but the service is fantastic and the food didn’t take long to find its way to our table. The smokehouse which is adjacent to the Jolly Fisherman smokes kippers to perfection, and it is easy to see why Craster is famous for them as we grilled them lightly back at home along with the fishcakes we bought too for a little treat.

Accessibility to Craster is excellent, there is plenty of parking available although it is quite popular when it’s a beautiful day and you might be surprised to see how many bays are filled so to avoid any disappointment, ensure you arrive early as possible in the day to seize it. Parking all day is relatively cheap and recommended if you wish to take in the sites and go for a bite to eat. Until next time Craster, the pleasure has been ours!